Past Events

This page provides a list of archived events we have held, including video recordings, related blogs, and (more recently) audio podcasts: Devpolicy Talks.

2022 | 2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011
The important, unanswered questions from PNG’s 2022 elections
The important, unanswered questions from PNG’s 2022 elections
1.30–2.30pm 28 October 2022
Dr Terence Wood

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Much is already clear about the 2022 elections in Papua New Guinea. They were bad, possibly the worst in the country’s history. Election-related violence was a serious problem, particularly in parts of the Highlands. The roll was inaccurate. Rumours of electoral conspiracies were rife online. Vote buying was a common problem.

Yet while aspects of the troubled 2022 elections are clear enough, there are still big uncertainties – questions that need to be answered if we are to understand what went wrong in 2022, and what can be expected from future elections. These questions cover areas ranging from election results, to parties, to struggles between aspiring prime ministers, to the future plans of international aid donors.

In this presentation, Dr Terence Wood outlined the main questions yet to be answered from the 2022 election, discuss possible answers, and discuss how associated challenges can be overcome.

Speaker
Dr Terence Wood is a Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre. His work includes the study of electoral politics in Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. He maintains the Papua New Guinea Elections Database.

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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The determinants of excess reserves in the PNG banking system
The determinants of excess reserves in the PNG banking system
12.30–1.30pm 30 September 2022
Thomas Wangi

This presentation examines why profit-maximising commercial banks in PNG demand non-remunerated excess reserves. An autoregressive distributed lag model is employed to estimate the determinants of excess reserves using time series data for the period January 2002 to December 2017. The model includes precautionary and involuntary factors that affect excess reserves in commercial banks. The findings suggest that discount rate, volatility of demand deposits and private sector deposits contribute to the accumulation of excess reserves, while foreign exchange reserves, private sector credit and treasury bill rates effectively reduce excess reserves pressure. The required reserve ratio, however, is not effective in influencing the demand for excess reserves. This empirical analysis concludes that involuntary variables are the leading determinants of excess reserves in PNG – and suggests that in order to address persistent excess reserves in the banking system, the central bank could consider potential policy interventions such as paying interest on reserves that commercial banks hold above the required limit and stimulating demand for domestic credit.

Speaker
Thomas Wangi, PhD Scholar, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics, ANU

This seminar is free and open to the public. Registration is required to attend the seminar. You can attend at the Brindabella Theatre (Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU), at the MBA Suite (SBPP building, UPNG), or online via Zoom.

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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The Global Fund in an era of pandemics
The Global Fund in an era of pandemics
12.30–1.30pm 23 August 2022
Peter Sands, Executive Director, The Global Fund

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» watch livestream replay

The last two years have been a vivid demonstration of how old and new pandemics interact. COVID-19 has been a catastrophe for those most affected by HIV, TB and malaria. In 2020, for the first time in The Global Fund’s history, we saw declines in key programmatic results across the three diseases. And as Omicron has demonstrated, Australia remains vulnerable to outbreaks in other parts of the world, unless everyone, everywhere is protected.

With a vast global footprint, The Global Fund ensures that the greatest global health needs are addressed and not restricted by geographical regions, whilst ensuring high standards of governance.

Peter Sands, the Executive Director of The Global Fund, lays out plans to build on 20 years of impact, to protect everyone, everywhere from the deadliest infectious diseases and build a healthier, more equitable world.

He makes the case that finishing the fight against earlier pandemics, the current one, and preparing for future pandemic threats are complementary dimensions of an overall effort to make everyone safer from infectious disease.

Speaker
Peter Sands, Executive Director, The Global Fund
A former Chief Executive Officer of Standard Chartered PLC, one of the world’s leading international banks, Sands has been a research fellow at Harvard University since 2015, dividing his time between the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Global Health Institute, working on a range of research projects in financial markets and regulation, fintech and global health.

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Institutional sources of cooperation, competition and conflict in developing countries
Institutional sources of cooperation, competition and conflict in developing countries
12.30–1.30pm 2 September 2022
Emeritus Professor William Maley

When major problems surface in public policy development and implementation, it is very tempting to look for individuals to blame. In some circumstances, there may indeed be individuals to blame, but there are good reasons to believe that problems often run deeper than individual culpability. The design of institutions, in particular, can significantly influence the incentives which different actors face. Some institutional structures can foster cooperation, some can foster healthy competition, and some can trigger or fuel conflict. This presentation identifies some specific examples in constitutional, political and administrative realms, within the wider context of the divergence in political theory between philosophies that seek to empower people to do good, and those that seek to limit people’s capacity to do bad.

Speaker
Emeritus Professor William Maley, Australian National University

This seminar is free and open to the public. Registration is required to attend the seminar. You can attend at the Brindabella Theatre (Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU), at the MBA Suite (SBPP building, UPNG), or online via Zoom.

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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Photo by @_seb on Unsplash
Missing migrants: border closures as a labour supply shock
2–3.30pm 23 August 2022
Lynda Sanderson (New Zealand Productivity Commission)

We study the firm-level impacts of a labour supply shock induced by the unanticipated closure of the New Zealand border due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The border closed in March 2020, in the middle of the fall arrival season for workers under the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme, preventing seasonal migrants from entering the country as planned. We identify firms that were expecting temporary workers but the workers did not arrive before the border closure and compare these firms to other firms where the workers arrived just before the border closure. We study the firm-level response to these “missing migrants”. Did affected firms hire other workers? Did wages need to increase to do so? Was productivity lower as a result? We find that firms and workers responded flexibly in the face of labour supply shocks. Firms whose seasonal workers failed to arrive were able to employ other workers locally, largely compensating for the shortfall of migrant workers. We find no evidence that firms with missing migrants increased wages to attract other workers, or that productivity or profitability fell in the short term.

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Updated:  31 January 2023/Responsible Officer:  Devpolicy Admin/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team