Past Events

This page provides a list of archived events we have held, including video recordings, related blogs, and (more recently) audio podcasts: Devpolicy Talks.

2022 | 2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011
The Global Fund in an era of pandemics
The Global Fund in an era of pandemics
12.30–1.30pm 23 August 2022
Peter Sands, Executive Director, The Global Fund

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» watch livestream replay

The last two years have been a vivid demonstration of how old and new pandemics interact. COVID-19 has been a catastrophe for those most affected by HIV, TB and malaria. In 2020, for the first time in The Global Fund’s history, we saw declines in key programmatic results across the three diseases. And as Omicron has demonstrated, Australia remains vulnerable to outbreaks in other parts of the world, unless everyone, everywhere is protected.

With a vast global footprint, The Global Fund ensures that the greatest global health needs are addressed and not restricted by geographical regions, whilst ensuring high standards of governance.

Peter Sands, the Executive Director of The Global Fund, lays out plans to build on 20 years of impact, to protect everyone, everywhere from the deadliest infectious diseases and build a healthier, more equitable world.

He makes the case that finishing the fight against earlier pandemics, the current one, and preparing for future pandemic threats are complementary dimensions of an overall effort to make everyone safer from infectious disease.

Speaker
Peter Sands, Executive Director, The Global Fund
A former Chief Executive Officer of Standard Chartered PLC, one of the world’s leading international banks, Sands has been a research fellow at Harvard University since 2015, dividing his time between the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Global Health Institute, working on a range of research projects in financial markets and regulation, fintech and global health.

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Institutional sources of cooperation, competition and conflict in developing countries
Institutional sources of cooperation, competition and conflict in developing countries
12.30–1.30pm 2 September 2022
Emeritus Professor William Maley

When major problems surface in public policy development and implementation, it is very tempting to look for individuals to blame. In some circumstances, there may indeed be individuals to blame, but there are good reasons to believe that problems often run deeper than individual culpability. The design of institutions, in particular, can significantly influence the incentives which different actors face. Some institutional structures can foster cooperation, some can foster healthy competition, and some can trigger or fuel conflict. This presentation identifies some specific examples in constitutional, political and administrative realms, within the wider context of the divergence in political theory between philosophies that seek to empower people to do good, and those that seek to limit people’s capacity to do bad.

Speaker
Emeritus Professor William Maley, Australian National University

This seminar is free and open to the public. Registration is required to attend the seminar. You can attend at the Brindabella Theatre (Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU), at the MBA Suite (SBPP building, UPNG), or online via Zoom.

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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Photo by @_seb on Unsplash
Missing migrants: border closures as a labour supply shock
2–3.30pm 23 August 2022
Lynda Sanderson (New Zealand Productivity Commission)

We study the firm-level impacts of a labour supply shock induced by the unanticipated closure of the New Zealand border due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The border closed in March 2020, in the middle of the fall arrival season for workers under the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme, preventing seasonal migrants from entering the country as planned. We identify firms that were expecting temporary workers but the workers did not arrive before the border closure and compare these firms to other firms where the workers arrived just before the border closure. We study the firm-level response to these “missing migrants”. Did affected firms hire other workers? Did wages need to increase to do so? Was productivity lower as a result? We find that firms and workers responded flexibly in the face of labour supply shocks. Firms whose seasonal workers failed to arrive were able to employ other workers locally, largely compensating for the shortfall of migrant workers. We find no evidence that firms with missing migrants increased wages to attract other workers, or that productivity or profitability fell in the short term.

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Financial inclusion in Papua New Guinea
Financial inclusion in Papua New Guinea
12.30–1.30pm 5 August 2022
Laura Nettuno

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This presentation contributes to the understanding of financial inclusion in developing countries by presenting a theoretical model of financial inclusion, building on Becker’s 1965 theory of the household to incorporate intra-household bargaining. A World Bank survey, in which uniquely both the male and female heads of each household were interviewed, is used to examine the effect of individual and household characteristics on financial inclusion at both the individual and household level in two provinces in Papua New Guinea. Findings include that female-headed households are more likely to be financially included, that the education level is the strongest predictor of all measures of financial inclusion, and that female decisions to include are positively influenced by their more educated male partners but the reverse does not hold. Distance, location (urban or rural), and whether the individual speaks English are also significant predictors.

Speaker
Laura Nettuno, PhD Scholar, Vanderbilt University

Co-author
Dr Martin Davies, Associate Professor of Economics, Washington and Lee University

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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Real wage growth in Papua New Guinea over three decades
Real wage growth in Papua New Guinea over three decades
12.30–1.30pm 24 June 2022
Dr Martin Davies

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As a key determinant of household welfare, workers’ real wages matter. Limited by small and infrequent surveys, the study of real wages in Papua New Guinea (PNG) has until now been constrained by a paucity of data. Using a novel dataset, we construct the first longitudinal series of wages for (to a close approximation) the population of formal private sector workers in PNG for a 20-year period, spanning three decades from 1999 to 2018. This allows us to examine real wage growth for the formal private sector in PNG over this period using a panel regression. Among the main findings are that conditional real wage growth over the sample period (controlling for worker fixed effect and experience and industry concentration) has averaged about 4.5 percent. Also, real wage developments closely mirror the bust-boom-bust episodes of the macroeconomic cycle. Further, conditional real wage growth in the agricultural sector has lagged behind the services, industry, and mining sectors with agriculture hardest hit during busts and lagging during the boom and mining the winner. Finally, men experience higher conditional real wage growth during the boom but also bear the brunt of the decrease during times of bust.

Speaker
Dr Martin Davies
Associate Professor of Economics, Washington and Lee University, and Visiting Fellow, Development Policy Centre, Australian National University

Co-author
Professor Niels-Hugo Blunch
Economics, Washington and Lee University

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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