Upcoming events

The Global Fund in an era of pandemics
The Global Fund in an era of pandemics
12.30–1.30pm 23 August 2022
Peter Sands, Executive Director, The Global Fund

The last two years have been a vivid demonstration of how old and new pandemics interact. COVID-19 has been a catastrophe for those most affected by HIV, TB and malaria. In 2020, for the first time in The Global Fund’s history, we saw declines in key programmatic results across the three diseases. And as Omicron has demonstrated, Australia remains vulnerable to outbreaks in other parts of the world, unless everyone, everywhere is protected.

With a vast global footprint, The Global Fund ensures that the greatest global health needs are addressed and not restricted by geographical regions, whilst ensuring high standards of governance.

Peter Sands, the Executive Director of The Global Fund, will lay out plans to build on 20 years of impact, to protect everyone, everywhere from the deadliest infectious diseases and build a healthier, more equitable world.

He will make the case that finishing the fight against earlier pandemics, the current one, and preparing for future pandemic threats are complementary dimensions of an overall effort to make everyone safer from infectious disease.

Speaker
Peter Sands, Executive Director, The Global Fund
A former Chief Executive Officer of Standard Chartered PLC, one of the world’s leading international banks, Sands has been a research fellow at Harvard University since 2015, dividing his time between the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Global Health Institute, working on a range of research projects in financial markets and regulation, fintech and global health.

This seminar is free and open to the public. Registration is required to attend. You can attend in person at the Brindabella Theatre, JG Crawford Building, 132 Lennox Crossing, or online via Zoom.

It will be recorded, and the recording will be available after the event on the Development Policy Centre website.

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Photo by @_seb on Unsplash
Missing migrants: border closures as a labour supply shock
2–3.30pm 23 August 2022
Lynda Sanderson (New Zealand Productivity Commission)

We study the firm-level impacts of a labour supply shock induced by the unanticipated closure of the New Zealand border due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The border closed in March 2020, in the middle of the fall arrival season for workers under the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme, preventing seasonal migrants from entering the country as planned. We identify firms that were expecting temporary workers but the workers did not arrive before the border closure and compare these firms to other firms where the workers arrived just before the border closure. We study the firm-level response to these “missing migrants”. Did affected firms hire other workers? Did wages need to increase to do so? Was productivity lower as a result? We find that firms and workers responded flexibly in the face of labour supply shocks. Firms whose seasonal workers failed to arrive were able to employ other workers locally, largely compensating for the shortfall of migrant workers. We find no evidence that firms with missing migrants increased wages to attract other workers, or that productivity or profitability fell in the short term.

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Institutional sources of cooperation, competition and conflict in developing countries
Institutional sources of cooperation, competition and conflict in developing countries
12.30–1.30pm 2 September 2022
Emeritus Professor William Maley

When major problems surface in public policy development and implementation, it is very tempting to look for individuals to blame. In some circumstances, there may indeed be individuals to blame, but there are good reasons to believe that problems often run deeper than individual culpability. The design of institutions, in particular, can significantly influence the incentives which different actors face. Some institutional structures can foster cooperation, some can foster healthy competition, and some can trigger or fuel conflict. This presentation identifies some specific examples in constitutional, political and administrative realms, within the wider context of the divergence in political theory between philosophies that seek to empower people to do good, and those that seek to limit people’s capacity to do bad.

Speaker
Emeritus Professor William Maley, Australian National University

This seminar is free and open to the public. Registration is required to attend the seminar. You can attend at the Bribdabella Theatre (Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU), at the MBA Suite (SBPP building, UPNG), or online via Zoom.

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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2022 PNG Update
2022 PNG Update
9am 20 October – 5pm 21 October 2022
Various speakers

Organised by the University of Papua New Guinea’s School of Business and Public Policy and the Australian National University’s Development Policy Centre, the annual PNG Update is the premier forum for the discussion of research and analysis relating to contemporary economic and public policy issues in PNG.

The 2022 PNG Update will be held at the University of Papua New Guinea Waigani campus on 20–21 October. This year’s theme is “Pathways to development amid COVID-19 and beyond PNG’s 10th election”.

Call for papers and panels is now open.

Find further information about the conference and call for papers.

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2022 Australasian AID Conference (AAC2022)
2022 Australasian AID Conference
12pm 28 November – 5pm 30 November 2022
Various speakers

After a break in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Australasian AID Conference (AAC) returns in 2022. Having been held in February in previous years, the conference will be shifted to the end of the year, permanently. The 2022 Australasian AID Conference will be held on 28–30 November, in partnership with The Asia Foundation.

As in previous years, the aim of AAC2022 is to bring together researchers from across Australia, the Pacific, Asia and beyond who are working on aid and international development policy (the AID in the conference acronym) to share insights, promote collaboration, and support development within the research community. With more than 650 people registering in 2020, the AAC has established itself as Australia’s premier aid and development conference.

Even before the pandemic, the AAC was a blended conference, with livestreaming and opportunities for online presentation. This tradition will continue in 2022. As before, the main emphasis will be on in-person participation and presentations, with all the opportunities for interaction and networking thereby afforded, but our virtual offerings will also be upgraded.

Call for papers and panels is now open.

See more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract or proposal.

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Updated:  13 August 2022/Responsible Officer:  Devpolicy Admin/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team