Upcoming events

Helping Family and Sexual Violence Survivors in Papua New Guinea
Helping Family and Sexual Violence Survivors in Papua New Guinea – the Evaluation of six years of Femili PNG’s Lae operations
12.30–1.30pm 20 October 2021
Denga Ilave and Dr Judy Putt

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Femili PNG is a PNG NGO that operates case management centres to assist survivors of family and sexual violence to access the services they need.

Earlier this year, Helping Family and Sexual Violence Survivors in Papua New Guinea – the Evaluation of six years of Femili PNG’s Lae operations, was published. The Evaluation measured Femili PNG’s progress against its four main strategic priorities, which relate to service delivery and organisational resilience, and the impact Femili PNG was having on its clients, the local community and more broadly. The Evaluator, Dr Judy Putt, conducted 40 interviews, mostly face to face, with staff and stakeholders. Femili PNG also gave unfettered access to non-confidential information and reports, and provided invaluable statistics from its client data platform.

Join Femili PNG’s Operations Director, Denga Ilave, and Dr Putt to discuss the Evaluation, methodology, findings and response.

Speakers

Denga Ilave, Lae Operations Director, Femili PNG

Dr Judy Putt, Research Fellow, Department of Pacific Affairs, Australian National University

The event will be a public seminar and will be recorded. The recording will be made available after the event through the Development Policy Centre website.

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Decentralisation in PNG: a political analysis
Decentralisation in PNG: a political analysis
12.30–1.30pm 29 October 2021
Professor Stephen Howes, Dr Lawrence Sause and Dr Lhawang Ugyel

This paper provides an overview of decentralisation in Papua New Guinea (PNG) since independence, with a focus on political decentralisation. We show that PNG’s decentralised system has several distinctive and, in some cases, unique features. It is constantly evolving – in fact, heading in different directions. PNG’s system of decentralisation has become highly complex, with four tiers of government. It relies heavily, perhaps uniquely so, on indirect representation, with both provincial assemblies and district committees dominated by national politicians. We also argue that four political forces have shaped, and will continue to shape, PNG’s decentralisation reforms: the political dominance within the country of national members of parliament (MPs); the dominance, within that group, of district over provincial MPs; as a countervailing force, strong, though variable, political support for provincial autonomy; and, finally, the underlying clientelistic, fragmented and unstable nature of PNG politics. These findings are consistent with those of Spina (2013) in a very different OECD context.

Speakers

Professor Stephen Howes
Director, Development Policy Centre, Australian National University

Dr Lawrence Sause
Deputy Executive Dean (Resources and Planning), School of Business and Public Policy, University of Papua New Guinea

Dr Lhawang Ugyel
Lecturer, School of Business, University of New South Wales

This online seminar is free and open to the public. Registration is required to attend.

This presentation is based on the speakers’ chapter in the forthcoming ANU-UPNG edited volume on contemporary issues in PNG.

The ANU-UPNG seminar series is part of the partnership between the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the UPNG School of Business and Public Policy, supported by the PNG-Aus Partnership.

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8,000 seasonal workers by 2025 from PNG
8,000 seasonal workers by 2025 from PNG
1–2pm 17 November 2021
Natasha Turia-Moka

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Since 2011 Papua New Guinea (PNG) has struggled to increase its participation in Australia’s Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP) and New Zealand’s Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme. In response, the PNG Government established an independent Labour Mobility Unit (LMU) in 2019 to boost its participation and send over 8,000 workers by 2025. The LMU partners with Provincial Governments and District Administrations to achieve that goal through a decentralised Regional Recruitment Hub (RRH) model. There have been a few early wins, with around 48 workers mobilised since late 2019 and another 80 plus workers that were due for mobilisation in March this year but were unable to travel due to COVID-19 and international travel restrictions. This paper highlights some of PNG’s adaptations in its RRH model and focuses on: current recruitment pathways, rural community participation, funding support to reduce mobilisation costs, trusted intermediaries, and the need for a national labour mobility policy.

Speaker

Natasha Turia-Moka
PhD Scholar, Department of Pacific Affairs, ANU

This online seminar is free and open to the public. It will be recorded, and the recording will be available after the event on the Development Policy Centre website.

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Updated:  18 October 2021/Responsible Officer:  Devpolicy Admin/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team