Past events

This page provides a list of archived events we have held, including video recordings, related blogs, and (more recently) audio podcasts: Development Policy Centre Podcast.

2013 Australian aid stakeholder survey
5.30–7pm 12 December 2013
Professor Stephen Howes, Director, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy; Marc Purcell, Executive Director, Australian Council for International Development (ACFID); Mel Dunn, Chair, International Development Contractors (IDC) Australia; Stephanie Copus-Campbell, CEO, Harold Mitchell Foundation.

In July and August 2013 the Development Policy Centre surveyed 356 stakeholders in the Australian aid program, from the senior executives of Australia’s biggest NGOs and development contracting companies, to the officials of multilateral, partner government and Australian government agencies. The survey asked them what they thought about the Australian aid program, what they liked, what they didn’t like, what they thought the future of aid was and what needed to be done to improve our aid.

And now the verdict is in. It’s a unique exercise, with a distinctive set of results. More than a baseline for future improvements, it’s a stocktake on where Australian aid has got to, and a critical input into where it needs to go. The event tackled questions such as:

  • Is our aid getting better or worse?
  • How do we compare to other donors?
  • What is our biggest strength, and what’s the biggest weakness?
  • How important is the national interest in aid decisions, and how important should it be?

The 2013 survey launch revealed how Australian aid stakeholders answered these questions, and discussed the implications of the finding.

Stephen Howes, Director of the Development Policy Centre presented the survey results. Marc Purcell, Executive Director of the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID), and Mel Dunn, Chair of International Development Contractors (IDC) Australia discussed the results. Stephanie Copus-Campbell, CEO of the Harold Mitchell Foundation chaired the proceedings.

This forum was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» view 2013 Aid stakeholder survey publications, presentations, podcasts and more

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Afghanistan: What has been achieved?
5.30–7pm 5 December 2013
Mark Kryzer and Palwasha Kakar, The Asia Foundation; Senator Alan Eggleston, Chair of the Afghanistan aid Senate inquiry; Nematullah Bizhan, ANU PhD student and former Afghanistan Deputy Minister for Youth.

As troops withdraw and aid declines, this is a critical period of transition for Afghanistan. At this forum, the speakers will question what has been achieved to date.

The event also includes the Australia launch of The Asia Foundation’s Survey of the Afghan People 2013. This is the biggest public opinion poll in Afghanistan, covering all 34 provinces. Through face-to-face interviews, over 9,000 Afghan citizens revealed their opinions on security, political participation, the economy, women’s rights, and development.

The forum will also scrutinise the 2013 report of the Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee on Australia’s overseas development programs in Afghanistan. This critical report found that while Afghanistan ‘remains in need of substantial and continuing aid,’ to date, Australian achievements in Afghanistan may not be as substantial as initial indicators suggest.

Speakers include:

  • Mark Kryzer, Afghanistan Country Representative, The Asia Foundation
  • Palwasha Kakar, Director of the Afghanistan Women’s Empowerment Program, The Asia Foundation
  • Senator Alan Eggleston, Liberal Party, Western Australia (Chair of the Afghanistan aid Senate inquiry.
  • Nematullah Bizhan, ANU PhD student working on aid to Afghanistan. He was formerly Afghanistan’s Deputy Minister for Youth among other positions.

This forum is presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» view presentation [pdf]
» listen to podcast

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Economics of climate change in the Pacific
2–3pm 27 November 2013
Dr Xianbin Yao, Director General, Pacific Department, Asian Development Bank; Cyn-Young Park, Assistant Chief Economist and Director, Economics Research Department, Asian Development Bank.

The Pacific region is particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, which carry the risk of significant economic costs. The Asian Development Bank’s report on the economics of climate change in the Pacific aims to raise the level of understanding of all sectors and stakeholders on possible impacts of climate change, with analyses that lead to regional strategies supported by national programs linked to local policies and activities. It focuses on Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, and Vanuatu with broader regional results also included.

In the report, projections of total economic damage to the Pacific due to climate change are provided in various scenarios. Economic assessment associated with climate information is undertaken to identify priority sectors, estimate funding needs, and prepare for economy-wide climate change impacts.

In this public seminar, Xianbin Yao, Director General of the Pacific Department of the Asian Development Bank and Cyn-Young Park, Assistant Chief Economist and Director of the Economic Analysis and Operations Support Division in the Economics Research Department of the Asian Development Bank presented the report’s key findings and discused its implications.

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Syria: Responding to the humanitarian challenge of a generation on the brink
3.30–4.30pm 20 November 2013
Luciano Calestini, Deputy representative from Lebanon, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

The unfolding crisis in Syria has left more than eight million people displaced from their homes. Cut off from vital services, desperately in need of water, food and health care, today an entire generation of Syrians are teetering on the brink. How does the international community respond to such a crisis? Luciano Calestini, currently coordinating UNICEF’s humanitarian response in Lebanon where more than 800,000 refugees are struggling to survive, provided a unique insight into the heart of one of the largest humanitarian crises the modern world has known.

Luciano Calestini was born in Sydney, Australia to a New Zealand mother and an Italian father. He spent his childhood equally between those three countries, completing his education in Australia before accepting a short-term mission to southern Sudan in the late 1990s to join the famine response. Luciano has also lived and worked in East Timor (in the aftermath of the 1999 referendum), in Kosovo (following the 1999 war), in western Afghanistan (after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization intervention), in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, and in Baghdad, Iraq. He recently completed a second three-year mission in Kosovo, during which time he was also deployed to support the cholera response in Haiti and the emergency response during the Libyan conflict.

Luciano is currently charged with coordinating UNICEF’s response to the Syrian crisis in Lebanon, and has been based in Beirut since January.

his lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Are the Asia and Pacific small states different from other small states?
12.30–2pm 19 November 2013
Dr Patrizia Tumbarello, Unit Chief, Pacific Islands Unit, International Monetary Fund (IMF); Vivek Suri, Lead Economist, East Asia and Pacific Region, World Bank; Peter Allum, Assistant Director, Strategic Policy Review Department, IMF.

The small states of the Asia and Pacific region face unique challenges in raising their growth potential and living standards relative to other small states due to their small populations, geographical isolation and dispersion, narrow export and production bases, exposure to shocks, and heavy reliance on aid. Higher fixed government costs, low access to credit by the private sector, and capacity constraints are also key challenges.

The econometric analysis confirms that the Pacific Island Countries (PICs) have underperformed relative to their peers over the last 20 years.

Although these countries often face more limited policy tools, policies do matter and can help build resilience and raise potential growth. The Asia and Pacific small states should continue rebuilding buffers and improve the composition of public spending. Regional solutions should also continue to be pursued.

Dr Patrizia Tumbarello, Unit Chief for the International Monetary Fund Pacific Island Unit presented on the IMF’s recent work on small states. Vivek Suri, the World Bank’s Lead Economist for the Pacific, acted as discussant.

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The 2013 Harold Mitchell Development Policy Annual Lecture: The challenges of aid dependency and economic reform: Africa and the Pacific
5.30–6.30pm 14 November 2013
Jim Adams, Former Vice President for East Asia and the Pacific, World Bank.

After decades of poor economic performance, Africa is doing much better, with higher economic growth. Why? What role did aid play? And what are the lessons for the Pacific? Jim Adams knows both Africa and the Pacific well. In the 2014 Harold Mitchell Development Policy Lecture, he focused on how effective economic reform emerged in Africa and related institutional and capacity issues. Drawing on this and his Pacific experience, he reviewed a number of proposals that could be taken by donors in the Pacific to accelerate economic reform and support the emergence of improved government institutions and capacity on policy making.

Jim Adams retired a year ago after 37 years at the World Bank. His last assignment was as the Vice President for East Asia and the Pacific from 2007 – 2012, where he worked on and travelled extensively in the Pacific island region. He spent almost half of his career working on Africa, leading the Bank’s program as the Regional Director in Kenya in the late 1980s and as Country Director in Tanzania and Uganda from 1995-2002. From 2002 to 2007 he served as the head of operational policy in the Bank, overseeing a program directed at making the Bank more responsive to its clients’ needs. Jim is a graduate of Colgate University and received his Masters degree from Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. Among his current duties, Jim Adams serves as Chair of AusAID’s Independent Evaluation Committee.

The Harold Mitchell Development Policy Annual Lecture Series, of which this is the second, has been created to provide a new forum at which the most pressing development issues can be addressed by the best minds and most influential practitioners of our time.

» view transcript, podcast and blog

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Global solutions: Are international organisations up to the challenge of providing global public goods for development?
12.30–2pm 18 September 2013
Warren Evans, The World Bank; Dr James Moody, Co-author, The Sixth Wave: How to Succeed in a Resource-Limited World; Professor Patrick Weller AO, Griffith University; Robin Davies, Crawford School of Public Policy.

The most serious problems that developing countries face are increasingly international in nature. Climate change, water scarcity, communicable diseases, food insecurity and the depletion of forests and fisheries—all these things call for cooperation at the regional or global levels, as well as action at the national level. Such cooperation is often mediated by international organisations and much of it is funded by aid. But global aid is shrinking in this era of austerity and international organisations face strong incentives to direct scarce resources to urgent national priorities. Moreover, international cooperation has had few wins in recent years and international organisations are increasingly facing crises of identity and relevance, with their missions, policies and governance arrangements coming under fire from many directions.

What would it take for international organisations to play a more effective role in dealing with global challenges important for development? Our three panelists addressed this question from complementary perspectives. Warren Evans talked about the financing and management reforms needed for the World Bank to play a more effective role in addressing climate change and providing other global goods. James Moody argued for more effective institutional arrangements to support innovation and the dissemination of knowledge for development. Patrick Weller presented findings emerging from his ongoing work on the governance of international organisations, illustrating how the informal dynamics of strategic decision-making both limit and create opportunities for reform. The panel was chaired by Robin Davies.

This forum was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University

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Tapping the Market: Opportunities for domestic investments in water and sanitation for the poor
12.30–1.30pm 13 September 2013
Jaehyang So, Manager, Water and Sanitation Program, The World Bank; Bob Warner, Director, Pacific Research Partnerships, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU.

Throughout the developing world, millions of people lack access to safe water and improved sanitation, which has high social and economic costs. The World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) has been advising client governments on the effective engagement of domestic private sector in the delivery of services and the development of water and sanitation markets that cater to the poor.

In this public event, Ms Jaehyang So and Bob Warner presented the findings of the WSP’s recently published report ‘Tapping the Market: Opportunities for domestic investments in water and sanitation for the poor’. The report is the first study of its kind to systematically assess the constraints of domestic firms in investing for increased supply to the poor. The study discusses the paradox of a large market dominated by small firms and concludes that enabling the domestic private sector to supply the base of the pyramid requires addressing a range of commercial, policy and institutional issues, and some rethinking about value chains, technology and the role of government.

Ms Jaehyang So has a background in urban service delivery, utilities and corporate restructuring, and public- private partnerships. Immediately prior to joining WSP, Ms So was the Lead Infrastructure Specialist in the Bank’s South Asia Regional Infrastructure Department working primarily on Bangladesh and Pakistan urban water and sanitation sector programs.

Bob Warner is Director, Pacific Research Partnerships at Crawford School of Public Policy.

This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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How do we plan, campaign and work in development? The reality of doing development in complex systems
6–7pm 12 September 2013
Dr Duncan Green, Senior Strategic Adviser, Oxfam Great Britain (GB)

How do we plan, campaign and work in development when we don’t know what is going to happen and we don’t know what solutions will work? Aid professionals know that real life has a way of ignoring our plans and procedures, but often we block out that knowledge in order to keep functioning. In this talk, Duncan Green asked what would we do differently, if we acknowledge and try to adapt to the messiness of reality.

Dr Duncan Green is Senior Strategic Adviser at Oxfam GB, Honorary Professor of International Development at Cardiff University and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Development Studies. He was previously a Visiting Fellow at Notre Dame University, a Senior Policy Adviser on Trade and Development at the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), a Policy Analyst on trade and globalisation at the Catholic Agency for Overseas Development (CAFOD) and Head of Research and Engagement at the Just Pensions project on socially responsible investment.

He is author of From Poverty to Power: How Active Citizens and Effective States can Change the World (Oxfam International, June 2008) and has written several books on Latin America including Silent Revolution: The Rise and Crisis of Market Economics in Latin America (2003), Faces of Latin America (2006) and Hidden Lives: Voices of Children in Latin America and the Caribbean (1998).

This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Goals for people: A review of post-2015 proposals, and some suggestions
12.30–1.30pm 29 August 2013
Robin Davies, Associate Director, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU.

Until recently, discussions on a new post-2015 framework to succeed the Millennium Development Goals mostly revolved around general principles or else very particular features of a possible landscape. Now, several proposals for an integrated post-2015 agenda have emerged. Most prominent among these is the illustrative framework offered by the UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel (HLP) of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Robin Davies gave a comparative assessment of the frameworks on offer, identified some pervasive defects, and suggested ways of repairing these.

Robin Davies is the Associate Director of the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU. He was previously a member of AusAID’s senior executive service for a decade, both in Australia and overseas. Most recently he headed AusAID’s international programs and partnerships division. Robin was Australia’s representative on the G20 Development Working Group from its establishment in 2010 until late 2011. He contributed to the development of a series of Australian and multilateral climate change initiatives in the period 2007 to 2010. He managed Australia’s aid program in Indonesia from 2003 to 2006 and represented Australia on The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Development Assistance Committee from 1999 to 2001.

This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Child protection in Afghanistan
12.30–1.30pm 15 August 2013
Kerry Boland, Consultant, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

Decades of conflict have eroded the physical and social fabric of Afghanistan, with severe impacts on the lives of children. Kerry Boland, consultant to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), talked about her experience building formal and informal mechanisms to protect children in Afghanistan.

Kerry Boland discussed her experience with UNICEF in supporting the Afghan government to set up a Child Protection Action Network (CPAN). Reflecting on her work with the Afghan government, NGOs, community and religious leaders in the provinces, she illustrated how child protection issues are identified and dealt with in local communities. In particular, she gave her perspective on initiatives to prevent and eradicate abuse and exploitation, with special attention to ending early and forced marriage and hazardous and exploitive labour.

Kerry has worked in a range of conflict-affected situations in Afghanistan, Chad, Sri Lanka, Turkey and elsewhere. Her work has focused on protection issues related to women and children. She is the author of Children on the Move, a UNICEF study on children of Afghan origin moving to western countries. She has worked for the Australian Red Cross and was a Senior Member of the Refugee Review Tribunal.
This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre and the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Election forum on Australian aid
6–7.30pm 14 August 2013
Dr Helen Szoke, Chief Executive Officer, Oxfam Australia; Professor Stephen Howes, Director, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU; The Hon Dr Andrew Leigh, Member for Fraser, ALP; Elizabeth Lee, Liberal candidate for Fraser ; Julie Melrose, Greens candidate for Canberra

Australia’s aid program has increased massively over the last decade, but its future is unclear, and aid policy has become controversial. The Labor Government has repeatedly delayed its target to lift aid 0.5 per cent of Gross National Income (GNI), and just this month slashed $900 million from the forward estimates for aid. The Coalition has not put any date to achievement of 0.5. There are also major aid policy and effectiveness issues at play, including aid for asylum seekers, aid to PNG, and aid to Africa. Labor has introduced a number of aid reforms, but the Coalition has called for “an increased focus on accountability, transparency and a reassessment of priorities within the aid program” (Julie Bishop at ANU, June 2012). The Greens support a lot more aid, and want an independent evaluator for the sector.

In this special 2013 Election forum, the ACT candidates discussed their parties’ approaches to aid. This event was sponsored by the Development Policy Centre and Oxfam ACT, with the support of Oaktree and Make Poverty History.

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Perspectives in global development:Industrial policies in a changing world
4–5pm 8 August 2013
Mario Pezzini, Director, OECD Development Centre

Since the mid-1990s, economic growth rates in large and populous middle-income countries have substantially outpaced those in OECD countries. This has reshaped the global economy and favoured convergence in global income per capita. The process of ‘shifting wealth’ was led by China and India, but other countries are also contributing to it, including Brazil and South Africa. In spite of the persistence of large gaps in income per capita between OECD and non-OECD economies and the wide inequality within developing countries, most developing countries have improved their macroeconomic management and have started to address long-term structural challenges.

Developing countries are still accumulating capital and labour but they are also improving capabilities and increasingly using and producing innovations. However, mastering technology and knowledge in order to move up the value chain is still a goal to be achieved for most of them. To address the new development challenges, some countries are implementing industrial policies to sustain growth by diversifying and upgrading domestic production.The renewed interest in industrial policy poses new challenges and opportunities for policy makers. These issues were explored in this lecture by Mario Pezzini and are based on the 2013 OECD Development Centre report, Perspectives on Global Development 2013: industrial policies in a changing world.

Mr Mario Pezzini is Director of the OECD Development Centre. Prior to joining the OECD, Mr Pezzini was Professor in Industrial Economics at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Paris as well as in US and Italian Universities. Mr Pezzini has also served as an advisor in the field of economic development, industrial organisation and regional economics in international organisations and think tanks, including the International Labour Organisation, United Nations Industrial Development Organisation, European Commission and Nomisma in Italy.
This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre and Crawford graduate course CRW8000, Government, Markets and Global Change at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Value for money in aid
4–5.30pm 6 August 2013
Dr Cathy Shutt Consultant, Institute of Development Studies; Russell McKay Effective Development Group Economist, GRM International

Aid agencies increasingly stress the importance of value for money, but what does this mean, and might a managerial focus on results actually undermine aid effectiveness, or simply result in aid confusion? This public forum addressed these questions from a variety of perspectives. Speakers included:

Dr Cathy Shutt, Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex and convenor of the Big Push Forward initiative. Dr Shutt has over 19 years’ experience working as a researcher and practitioner in international aid. She started her work as a development practitioner helping southern-based community organisations and NGOs in the Philippines, Cambodia and Thailand to manage relationships with donors and demonstrate accountability. In this forum Dr Shutt critiqued UK approaches to value for money in aid.

Russell McKay, Effective Development Group, GRM International. Mr McKay is a seasoned agricultural economist who, after success as a regional manager, lecturer and agricultural economist in the Middle East, South Africa and the United Kingdom, is focused on developing innovative Monitoring and Evaluation instruments and providing technical input to key projects. In this forum, Mr McKay discussed practical considerations around value for money metrics – especially for intangible elements that are more difficult to represent quantitatively.

This forum was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Texts, tweets and social change: How can communications contribute to development?
9–10.30am 30 July 2013
Oren Murphy, Regional Director for Asia, Internews; Dr Nicholas Farrelly, Research Fellow, School of International, Political and Strategic Studies, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU; Matt Abud, Research Consultant for Indonesia, Internews; Sarah Logan, PhD scholar, Department of International Relations, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU

Over the past decade, the world has witnessed a digital revolution and its impacts have not been limited to those living in wealthy countries. By 2014, it is predicted there will be more active mobile phones on the planet than people.

Increasingly, those in the aid sector are seeing the potential for these media and communication technologies to be harnessed for development.

But can these tools transform democracy, governance, transparency, accountability and humanitarian responses? Or does their power lie in generating hype rather than impact?

Drawing on their experience implementing programs and conducting research in Asia and the Pacific, panelists from ANU and Internews, an NGO working to strengthen information quality and access in developing countries, discussed and answered questions on the potential of new communications technologies and approaches.

This forum was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Does official development assistance have a future?
12.30–1.30pm 3 July 2013
Simon Scott Head, Statistics and Monitoring Division, Development Cooperation Directorate, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

The end of official development assistance (ODA) has been confidently predicted for decades. But a funny thing happened at the end of the 90s. A set of development targets identified by the OECD mutated into the Millennium Development Goals and political momentum returned to the aid effort. Annual ODA rose by two-thirds in the decade leading up to 2010. But the knives are out again in finance departments around the world, and critics charge that ODA measurements are inflated in any case. Will ODA always be with us?

Simon Scott heads the Statistics and Monitoring Division of the OECD’s Development Cooperation Directorate. He oversees the collection and analysis of data on flows of ODA and other resources, and advises the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee on ‘performance against its members’ ODA volume commitments’, trends in financing for development and questions relating to the scope and limits of the concept of ODA. Before joining the OECD in 1993, he worked for AusAID for 14 years. He is the author of Philanthropic Foundations and Development Co-operation and Measuring Aid: 50 years of DAC statistics, and co-author of Innovative Financing to Fund Development.

This seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University.

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2013 Pacific and PNG Update - Day 2
9am–5pm 28 June 2013
Various speakers

The 2013 Pacific and PNG Update provides a forum for the discussion of the latest economic, social and political developments in the region. The Update was hosted by the Development Policy Centre, and supported by the Asian Development Bank’s Pacific Economic Management Technical Assistance Project; and the Asia and Pacific Policy Studies, the flagship publication of the Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU in partnership with Australian Aid, AusAID.

The updates are designed to bring together leading thinkers and policy makers from the Pacific and Papua New Guinea to discuss important topics such as regional trade and integration, employment and labor mobility, and service delivery, resource management and gender-based violence.

The 2013 Pacific Update consisted of two days of panel discussions: day one on the Pacific; and day two on Papua New Guinea.

» view 2013 Pacific perspectives conference program
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2013 Pacific and PNG Update - Day 1
9am–5pm 27 June 2013
Various speakers

The 2013 Pacific and PNG Update provided a forum for the discussion of the latest economic, social and political developments in the region. The Update was hosted by the Development Policy Centre, and supported by: the Asian Development Bank’s Pacific Economic Management Technical Assistance Project; and the Asia and Pacific Policy Studies, the flagship publication of the Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU in partnership with Australian Aid, AusAID.

The updates are designed to bring together leading thinkers and policy makers from the Pacific and Papua New Guinea to discuss important topics such as regional trade and integration, employment and labor mobility, and service delivery, resource management and gender-based violence.

The 2013 Pacific Update consisted of two days of panel discussions: day one on the Pacific; and day two on Papua New Guinea.

» view 2013 Pacific perspectives conference program
» view program
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Two decades of poverty in PNG
3–4pm 5 June 2013
Professor John Gibson, University of Waikato

Papua New Guinea recently completed its second national household consumption survey, potentially enabling poverty comparisons with baseline estimates from 14 years earlier. But the methods used by the recent 2009/10 Household Income and Expenditure Survey (HIES) differ in important ways from those of the 1996 PNG Household Survey (PNGHS) which makes poverty comparisons more difficult.

This talk described the two surveys and the poverty estimates derived from them, and discussed the apparent trends from the poverty comparisons that are possible. Special attention was paid to the poverty situation in Port Moresby, for which longer term comparisons are possible (by also using the Urban Household Survey of the 1980s) that are less affected by changes in survey methods.

John Gibson is a Professor in the Department of Economics, University of Waikato and a Senior Research Associate of Motu Economic and Public Policy Research. Since receiving his PhD from Stanford University he has worked in Cambodia, China, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Russia, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Timor Leste, Tonga, Vanuatu, and Vietnam. His recent publications have appeared in the Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Journal of Health Economics.
This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National University.

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Disability-inclusive development forum
12.30–2pm 30 May 2013
Monthian Buntan, Thai Senator and member of UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; Setareki S. Macanawai, CEO of the Pacific Disability Forum; Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo, Coordinator, Office for Disability and Inclusive Development, USAID and; Stephen Howes Director, Development Policy Centre, ANU

People with disability are among the poorest and most marginalised in developing countries. One estimate is that there are one billion people with disability worldwide, including 20% of the world’s poorest. The challenge of making development disability-inclusive has traditionally received little attention, but that is now changing. AusAID has been playing a leadership role with its Development for All strategy (2009-2014).

Members of AusAID’s Disability-Inclusive Development Reference Group reflected on their own personal stories, on reforms and programs they have been involved in, and on what is needed to obtain a fair go for people with disability in developing countries.

Is disability-inclusive development just the latest aid fad? Can poor countries afford to look after their citizens with disability? What can donors do? What have they achieved?

Speakers:
- Monthian Buntan, Thai Senator and member of UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
- Setareki S. Macanawai, CEO of the Pacific Disability Forum
- Charlotte McClain-Nhlapo, Coordinator, Office for Disability and Inclusive Development, USAID
- Stephen Howes Director, Development Policy Centre, ANU.

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Business, politics and the state in Africa: Challenging the orthodoxies
12.30–1.30pm 24 May 2013
David Booth, Director, Africa Power and Politics Program (APPP) / Research Fellow, Politics

Having achieved historically unprecedented economic growth over recent years, African countries now face the challenge of structurally transforming their economies. However, the politics of how to do this remains controversial. The standard international advice on good governance and the adoption of a ‘golden thread’ of sound institutions is not supported by historical and comparative evidence.

The key thing is not getting the right institutions but having a political settlement that allows economic rents to be harnessed to development purposes rather than used to cement a pragmatic bargain among ethically or otherwise divided elites. In view of the likely predominance in Africa of competitively clientelistic trajectories, attention should be focused on creative ways of mitigating their negative implications for economic transformation.

These are among the headline findings of Africa Power and Politics Program (APPP) a five-year research program led by ODI with research teams in Ghana, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe, and partners in the US and France.

David Booth was Director of APPP during 2007-12 and now coordinates a follow-on project on Initiating and Sustaining Developmental Regimes in Africa. Before joining ODI in 1998, he was Professor of Development Studies at the University of Wales, Swansea. He was also a managing editor of the Journal of Development Studies and Development Policy Review.
This lecture is presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University.

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Globalisation and inequality
12–1pm 23 May 2013
Francois Bourguignon, Director of the Paris School of Economics, France and former World Bank Chief Economist

Two important trend reversals have taken place in global inequality over the last 25 years: the inequality between countries has started to decrease after two centuries of steady increase and the inequality within many countries has started to rise after a long period of stability, in particular in developed countries.

After documenting this evolution, Francois Bourguignon, former Chief Economist at the World Bank, focused on two sets of questions. First, is globalisation the main cause behind this paradoxical change in global inequality? Second, if it is the case, what should be done to prevent further rises in within-country inequality that could derail the process of globalisation and, at the same time, the progress towards less unequal standards of living across countries?

Francois Bourguignon is professor of economics at the Paris School of Economics and at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. He is a specialist in the economics of development, public policy, income distribution and inequality and has authored many academic papers and books. Prior to his current appointment, he held the position of Chief Economist at the World Bank from 2003 to 2007.

This public lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
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Combatting family and sexual violence in PNG: What has been achieved and what is needed?
12.30–1.30pm 22 May 2013
Ume Wainetti, National Coordinator of the PNG Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee (FVAC)

The incidence of family and sexual violence in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is amongst the highest in the world.

Ume Wainetti is National Coordinator of the PNG Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee (FSVAC), the body charged with coordinating the national response to gender-based violence.She has years of experience in leading PNG’s response to gender-based violence.

In this public forum, Ume Wainetti explored the gains made, the promising approaches, and the challenges ahead for an effective response to gender-based violence in PNG. In particular, she argues for the critical need to fill the missing gap in case management to ensure that survivors in PNG have a better chance of getting the services and support they need.
This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy. The Australian National University.

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How can the private sector help the bottom billion?
3–4pm 21 May 2013
Paul Collier, Professor of Economics and Director, Centre for the Study of African Economies, Oxford University

In his universally acclaimed and award-winning book The Bottom Billion, Paul Collier argues that fifty failed states-home to the poorest one billion people on earth-pose the central challenge of the developing world in the twenty-first century. In this public lecture, Professor Collier explored how the private sector can engage to help the bottom billion.

Paul Collier is currently Advisor to the Strategy and Policy Department of the IMF; advisor to the Africa Region of the World Bank; and he has advised the British Government on its recent White Paper on economic development policy. His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy and growth in low-income and natural-resources rich societies.

Paul is an advisor for several African governments, and is currently also advising on the agenda for the G8. His work focuses on the governance of natural resources, the development of fragile states, and making cities work better in low-income countries.

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2013/14 Aid budget forum
9–10.30am 15 May 2013
Stephen Howes Director, Development Policy Centre; Helen Szoke Chief Executive Officer, Oxfam; Angus Barnes Independent Consultant, Development Linkages and Executive member, IDC Australia; Anthony Swan Research Fellow, Development Policy Centre

Many questions surround the 2013-14 aid budget. In the May 2012 budget, Labor pushed back its goal of increasing aid to 0.5% of GNI by a year to 2016/17. In response the Coalition removed the timetable from its commitment altogether. To deliver on its promise of a foreign aid increase this year to 0.37% of GNI, the Government needs to increase aid by about $600 million. But will it? As we move towards an election with the government under fiscal pressure, what will the 2013-14 aid budget look like? Will the cuts to the aid budget associated with funding of asylum-seeker costs be reversed? Is the expansion of the aid program to Africa now a thing of the past? And what is happening to the aid effectiveness agenda?

The annual aid budget is the most important event for the aid sector. And it is a time when the entire sector converges on Canberra for the budget lock up. The Development Policy Centre presented its analysis. We also heard from a member of the executive at IDC Australia, and the new head of Oxfam.

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The Future of International Development in Asia and the Pacific
9am 9 May – 5pm 10 May 2013
Various speakers

Transformations in the global economy and international political order, and the growth of international private finance for development, are increasingly raising questions about the purpose and future of aid, particularly in the context of international discussions about the post-2015 global development framework. The scale of Asia’s growth over the coming decades will make it the world’s biggest economic zone, increasingly able to address its own poverty challenges and contribute to poverty reduction elsewhere. At the same time, Asia and the Pacific are at the centre of an array of global challenges that pose serious threats to development progress. By examining the outlook for aid and development in Asia and the Pacific, looking beyond 2015 from diverse perspectives, this conference aimed to make a distinctly regional contribution to a global conversation.

Conference materials
» view overview
» view program
» read FIDAP 2013 background paper

Videos
» Keynote - Dr Alison Evans: “Emergence, divergence and why poverty still matters”
» Keynote - Dr Jimmie Rodgers: “Small islands, big challenges, maximising opportunities for development – A Pacific perspective”
» Keynote and Q&A - Dr Jimmie Rodgers and Dr Alison Evans
» Session 1 - The rise of Asia and the future of aid
» Session 2 - Dealing with common challenges: Aid and international public goods
» Session 3 - The evolving international agenda

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Climate change: Avoiding a four degree warmer world
5.30–6.30pm 21 March 2013
Rachel Kyte, Vice President for the Sustainable Development Network, World Bank

Rachel Kyte, Vice President for Sustainable Development at the World Bank, spoke about the risk a 4 degree warmer world poses for development and the impact of sea-level rise, heat waves and extreme weather events globally, and in Australia and Oceania. Everyone will be affected by the changing climate, but the poor and vulnerable will suffer most.

She argued that we must avoid a 4 degree warmer world and prepare for 2 degrees, and highlighted the actions that would make the biggest difference. However, while climate change is a major threat, inclusive green growth is an opportunity. Ms Kyte outlined the World Bank Group’s efforts to catalyze climate-smart development and green growth.

Rachel Kyte became Vice President of Sustainable Development at the World Bank in September, 2011. As such, she has overall responsibilities for the organization’s global work in agriculture, environment, energy, infrastructure, urban, and social development, along with global public goods issues in those areas. Prior to her appointment, she was the International Finance Corporation’s (IFC) Vice President for Business Advisory Services and a member of IFC’s Management Team.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy,The Australian National University.

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Public expenditure and financial management in fragile states
12.30–1.30pm 5 March 2013
Marcus Manuel, Alastair McKechnie & Edward Hedger, Centre for Aid & Public Expenditure, Overseas Development Institute

Few would argue that a country’s development trajectory is not crucially influenced by its government’s ability to manage public resources. The stability of the economy, the delivery of basic services such as education and health - even the legitimacy of the state itself - all greatly depend on effective and equitable public finance management. In fragile and conflict-affected states, public finance reforms have been high on the agenda for both donors and governments alike – and a key part of the picture has been how aid is delivered and managed. But what kinds of reforms and what kind of instruments have proved the most successful? And how can the international community best support the governments of fragile states?

This seminar explored these questions from the perspectives of both research and practice. Marcus Manuel and Alastair McKechnie talked on the lessons emerging from ODI’s Budgets Strengthening Initiative, a project which provides ‘arms-length’ support to the governments of fragile states to build better budgets through a team of international experts and in-country advisors. Edward Hedger presented the findings of a major Overseas Development Institute (ODI)/World Bank study into public finance reforms in post-conflict countries.

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Economics benefits of a One Health approach
12.30–1.30pm 26 February 2013
Jonathan Rushton, Professor of Animal Health Economics, Royal Veterinary College.

The One Health Initiative is a movement to forge inclusive collaborations between physicians, veterinarians and other scientific-health and environmentally related disciplines. It’s a transdisciplinary way of thinking, used by those working towards a common goal of optimising human and animal health globally.

One Health concepts and ideas are some of the oldest in the health discipline, yet they have not become mainstream. In this public lecture, Jonathan Rushton, Professor of Animal Health Economics, Royal Veterinary College, will explore the economic logic of health interventions, areas where One Health can add value to an infectious disease management and whether this added value is sufficient for a One Health business case in order to improve resource allocation and improve economic and social returns.

Jonathan Rushton is an agricultural economist who specialises in livestock economics and development. He works on livestock development, animal diseases and One Health issues in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. He sits on the management committee of the Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture and Health, is a non-executive director of the Animal Health and Welfare Board for England and has played a role in the debates on One Health through his continuing associations with the World Bank, FAO and CDC.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy,The Australian National University.

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Economics and emigration: Trillion-dollar bills on the sidewalk?
12.30–1.30pm 17 January 2013
Dr Michael Clemens, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development (CGD)

One of the biggest growth opportunities in the world economy lies not in the mobility of goods or capital, but in the mobility of labour.

Many people born in low-income countries would like to leave those countries, but barriers prevent their emigration. Those barriers, according to economists’ best estimates to date, cost the world economy much more than all remaining barriers to the international movement of goods and capital combined. Yet economists spend a great time studying the movement of goods and capital, and when they study migration at all, they focus on the effects of immigration on nonmigrants in destination countries.

Dr Michael Clemens explored why this is the case and sketch a four-point research agenda on the effects of emigration. Barriers to emigration, Dr Clemens argued, deserve a research priority that is commensurate with their likely colossal economic effects.

Michael Clemens is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development where he leads the Migration and Development initiative. His current research focuses on the effects of international migration on people from and in developing countries, and on rigorous impact evaluation for aid projects. He also serves as CGD’s Research Manager.

This public lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Updated:  25 February 2016/Responsible Officer:  Crawford Engagement/Page Contact:  Devpolicy Admin