Past events

This page provides a list of archived events we have held, including video recordings, related blogs, and (more recently) audio podcasts: Development Policy Centre Podcast.

‘A lost decade? Service delivery and reforms in Papua New Guinea 2002-2012’ Australian launch
12.30–2pm 11 December 2014
H.E. Mr Charles W Lepani, Papua New Guinea High Commissioner; Dr Thomas Webster, Director, The National Research Institute of Papua New Guinea (NRI); and Professor Stephen Howes, Director, Development Policy Centre.

Has PNG been able to translate its economic boom into services for ordinary people?

Based on research undertaken jointly by the National Research Institute (NRI) and the Development Policy Centre, ANU, the report ‘A lost decade? Service delivery and reforms in Papua New Guinea 2012-2012’ [PDF] compares two surveys in 2002 and 2012 of some 360 primary schools and health care clinics across the country, from the national capital to the most remote districts.

It assesses progress on health and education service delivery over time, and analyses the impact of important policy reforms.

The report was launched in Australia by the PNG High Commissioner, Charles W. Lepani. Speakers included Dr Thomas Webster, Director of NRI and Professor Stephen Howes, Director of the Development Policy Centre.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» view presentation
» listen to podcast

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The more things change? What was different about the 2014 elections in Solomon Islands and what it means for development
12.30–1.30pm 8 December 2014
Dr Terence Wood, Research Fellow, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School, ANU.

The 2014 elections in Solomon Islands brought an intriguing mix of change and continuity. For the first time ever a sitting prime minister lost his seat. Yet the average incumbent survival rate was much higher than usual. The elections were preceded by the passage of legislation designed to promote political parties, and the number of candidates associated with parties increased considerably. Yet the proportion of winning candidates who were independents was actually unusually high. Meanwhile, on the campaign trail it was easy to find the rhetoric of good governance and change, but election results themselves suggest that, typically, constituency level electoral contests were won or lost through the usual mechanisms. On the other hand, new civil society groups and social media - possibly - could be seen to be playing a larger role in elections in 2014 than in previous years.

In this seminar Terence Wood talked on the recent elections in Solomon Islands and the results that have emerged from them. He also discussed what, if anything, has changed about Solomon Islands’ underlying political economy, and what this means for the country’s development prospects.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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» listen to podcast

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Afghanistan 2014: a survey of the Afghan people
5.30–6.45pm 3 December 2014
David D Arnold, Najla Ayubi, and Zack Warren, The Asia Foundation; Professor William Maley, and Professor Ian McAllister, ANU.

With the conclusion of the first democratic transition of power in the country’s history and the continuing drawdown of foreign troops, what do the people of Afghanistan think are the most critical issues facing the country?

This survey, based on face-to-face interviews with a nationally representative sample of nearly 9,300 Afghan citizens, reveals their views on security, national reconciliation, the economy, development and essential services, governance and political participation, corruption, justice, gender equality, and access to information. Conducted across the country’s 34 provinces, The Asia Foundation’s series of annual surveys in Afghanistan provides an unmatched barometer of Afghan public opinion over time, serving as a resource for policymakers in government, the international community and the broader Afghan public.

This event featured experts from The Asia Foundation, as well as a commentary from Professor William Maley, Director of the Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy, ANU. Professor Ian McAllister, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, ANU acted as chair.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University and The Asia Foundation.

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» listen to presentation

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The challenges of fighting corruption in Papua New Guinea
12.30–1.30pm 27 November 2014
Sam Koim, Chairman, Taskforce Sweep and Principal Legal Officer, Department of Justice and Attorney General, Papua New Guinea.

Corruption in Papua New Guinea is widely accepted to be a major development challenge. The fight against it was recently bolstered by the introduction of a new anti-corruption taskforce. In 2011 Taskforce Sweep, a multi-agency anti-corruption taskforce, was set up by Prime Minister Peter O’Neill to investigate, prosecute and recover the proceeds of crime. The agency was initially successful in recouping corrupt funds, instigating numerous arrests and prosecuting a senior politician. But in 2014 Prime Minister O’Neill ordered the agency disbanded after O’Neill himself was served with an arrest warrant over his alleged role in a corruption scandal. While the legality of the PM’s decision is being decided in the courts, Taskforce Sweep continues to operate in an increasingly difficult environment.

In this presentation, the Chairman of Taskforce Sweep, Sam Koim, reflected upon his experiences in fighting corruption in PNG. He explained the institutional arrangements that led to Sweep’s initial success and outline the issues that threaten these arrangements. The presentation highlighted what these challenges mean for ongoing anti-corruption efforts in the country.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» listen to podcast
» read blog

Media
» PNG prime minister investigated over claims of misconduct, ABC News, 28 November 2014.

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Malaria elimination in the Asia Pacific by 2030
12.30–1.30pm 25 November 2014
Sir Richard Feachem, Director, The Global Health Group, Professor of Global Health, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Half of all countries in the world have eliminated malaria, mostly since the Second World War. Ambitious strategies are now being put in place to eradicate human malaria worldwide by 2050 and to eliminate malaria in the Asia Pacific region by 2030. The Asia Pacific goal has recently been discussed at the East Asia Summit in Myanmar. Sir Richard presented the historical progress with malaria elimination and the prospects and requirements for global eradication by 2050. He focused on recent dramatic progress in Asia Pacific and the Asia Pacific goal of malaria freedom by 2030. Sir Richard drew attention to the successful elimination (re-elimination) in Sri Lanka, and the striking progress in countries such as China, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Outstanding challenges, such as artemisinin resistance in the Mekong Region and malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, was discussed. The political and financial requirements for malaria elimination in Asia Pacific was also elaborated.

Sir Richard Feachem is Director of the Global Health Group at UCSF Global Health Sciences, Professor of Global Health at both the University of California, San Francisco and the University of California, Berkeley, and former Executive Director of Global Health Sciences. He is also a Visiting Professor at London University and an Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy,The Australian National University.

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» listen to podcast

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The rise of inequality and the new economic development consensus
12.30–1.30pm 12 November 2014
Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International.

Inequality is on the rise globally and in Australia. The richest 85 people own the same wealth as the poorest 3.5 billion people. World leaders and global economic institutions are increasingly raising the alarm about the risk extreme economic inequality poses to social stability and the strength and sustainability of economic growth itself.

While some economic inequality is essential to drive growth and progress, the extreme levels of wealth concentration occurring today threaten to exclude hundreds of millions of people from realising the benefits of their talents and hard work. Extreme economic inequality is damaging and worrying for many reasons: it is morally questionable; it can have negative impacts on economic growth and poverty reduction; and it can weaken the social fabric. It also compounds other inequalities, such as those between women and men.

Oxfam International’s Executive Director Winnie Byanyima is a grass-roots activist, human rights advocate, senior international public servant, and world recognised expert on inclusive development and women’s rights. Over the last year Winnie has shared platforms with world leaders, the Pope, the heads of the OECD and IMF. As Australia prepares to host the G20 Leaders’ Summit in Brisbane, Ms Byanyima is visiting Australia to draw attention to the causes and impacts of rising inequality and to urge G20 leaders to take action on lasting solutions.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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» listen to podcast

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ODI Fellowships: opportunities for postgraduates
12.30–1.30pm 28 October 2014
Darren Lomas, Programme Officer, Fellowship Scheme, Overseas Development Institute (ODI).

The ODI Fellowship scheme recruits intelligent, adventurous postgraduate economists to work in the public sectors of developing countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific on two-year placements. The scheme represents an exciting opportunity for recent or current postgraduates to undertake practical work in a developing country and assist in directly shaping national or sectoral policy. Fellows work in government ministries, central banks or regional organisations as economists or statisticians undertaking a range of assignments including: budgeting; macro-economic planning and forecasting; advising on regional and international trade issues; mainstreaming HIV/AIDS issues into wider government policy; advising on natural resource management; climate change finance; and overseeing privatisation programs.

At this public seminar, Darren Lomas discussed the fellowship scheme and provided details on the recruitment and application process for 2015-2017 posts.

•For those studying for a postgraduate degree at the time of application, the award of a Fellowship will be conditional upon the successful completion of their degree.

To read some first-hand experiences of current and former Fellows, please see the following page: http://www.odi.org/fellowship-scheme/experiences

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Careers in Development
6–7.30pm 15 October 2014
Jacqui De Lacy, Abt JTA; Chris Adams, ACFID; Alwyn Chilver, GRM International; Ashlee Betteridge, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School.

Many young people are interested in a career in international development. Thousands volunteer in development organisations across the country, and development studies and international relations are some of the most popular undergraduate university courses in Australia. The appeal of a career that combines doing good with international travel is undeniable. But the popularity of the field also makes it competitive, and it can be tough for students to know where to start.

This public seminar, hosted by the Development Policy Centre and the ANU Aid and Development Learning Community, gave students the chance to hear from those working in the development sector. Our panelists spoke about their own careers in the aid program, NGOs and the private sector. Students also heard about some of the entry points to a development career, such as volunteering, and had the chance to ask questions.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Voice and agency: empowering women and girls for shared prosperity
5.30–7pm 25 September 2014
Jeni Klugman, Senior Adviser, The World Bank Group; Elizabeth Broderick, Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Australian Human Rights Commission; plus other prominent speakers.

Voice and Agency: empowering women and girls for shared prosperity [PDF] is a major new report by the World Bank that shines a spotlight on the value of empowerment, the patterns of constraints that limit their realization, and the associated costs, not only to individual women but to their families, communities, and societies. It highlights promising policies and interventions, and it identifies priority areas where further research and more and better data and evidence are needed.

In this public event, Jeni Klugman, Senior Adviser, The World Bank Group and Fellow, Kennedy School, Harvard University, presented the report’s main findings. We also assembled a great panel to discuss the report, consisting of:

Elizabeth Broderick, Sex Discrimination Commissioner, Australian Human Rights Commission; Dame Carol Kidu, former Papua New Guinea Member of Parliament, Minister for Community Development and advocate for women’s rights; and Ewen McDonald, Deputy Secretary, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The event will be chaired by Fiona Jenkins, Convenor of the ANU Gender Institute.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy and the Gender Institute, The Australian National University.

» view presentation
» listen to podcast

Blogs
» Voice and agency: Jeni Klugman on the World Bank’s gender empowerment report, by Jeni Klugman and Ashlee Betteridge on October 23, 2014.
» Dame Carol Kidu on why things are getting tougher for PNG’s women, by Carol Kidu and Ashlee Betteridge on October 29, 2014.

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Political economy and the aid industry in Asia
12.30–1.30pm 19 September 2014
Dr Jane Hutchison, Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Studies, School of Management and Governance, Murdoch University.

In the last decade, many international development agencies have turned to political economy analysis to try to improve the effectiveness of their programs and projects. Sometimes political economy has been used for better risk analysis, but it has also been applied more positively to determine the social and political ‘drivers of change’ and how aid agencies might work more politically. However, the agencies involved have struggled to operationalise political economy insights.

Drawing on case study research in Southeast Asia, this seminar outlined the limits and possibilities entailed in an alternative, structural political economy, approach to development policy and practice. In particular, it explains the analytical typology of reformers and their alliances that a Murdoch-based research team presents in the forthcoming book Political Economy and the Aid Industry in Asia (Palgrave 2014), written by Jane Hutchison, Wil Hout, Caroline Hughes and Richard Robison.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» view presentation

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Securitisation of aid and NGOs post-9/11
12.30–1.30pm 2 September 2014
Dr Jude Howell, Professor of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences.

In this public seminar, Dr Jude Howell, Professor of International Development at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), argued that the securitisation of NGOs post-9/11 has raised both practical issues about aid delivery and the security of NGO workers, as well as broader questions around the purpose of aid and development of civil society.

Dr Jude Howell is Professor of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences (LSE). She was Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science Centre for Civil Society between 2003 and 2010, running a wide range of internationally focused research projects and events on civil society. She was Director of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) research programme on non-governmental public action and Series Editor of the Palgrave Press book series on Non-Governmental Public Action, in which her book The Global War on Terror, Aid and Civil Society (with Jeremy Lind), 2009, appears. She has written extensively on issues relating to civil society, development, security, gender and governance, and on China in particular.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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» listen to podcast

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Poverty in Asia: a deeper look
12.30–1.30pm 28 August 2014
Dr Guanghua Wan, Principal Economist and Head, Poverty-Inequality Research Group, Asian Development Bank.

Based on Key Indicators 2014, a flagship publication of the Asian Development Bank, this presentation argued that conventional wisdom on poverty measurement fails to consider significant challenges of food insecurity, increasing inequality and rising vulnerability. Once these additional elements are brought in, the hope for an Asia free of poverty by 2020 looks unlikely. Instead, it is more likely poverty will remain prevalent in Asia beyond even 2030.

Dr Guanghua Wan is Principal Economist and Head, Poverty-Inequality Research Group, the Asian Development Bank. Previously, he was Senior Economist in the United Nations and taught in a number of Universities in Australia and China.

Trained in development economics and econometrics, Dr Wan is an award-wining scholar on the Chinese economy and an expert on Asia, with an outstanding publication record of more than 100 professional articles and a dozen books including two by Oxford University Press. An honorary professor of over ten top institutions in China including Fudan and Zhejiang Universities, Dr Wan is among the top eight per cent economists globally and top four per cent, in Asia according to the latest ranking of REPEC.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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» listen to podcast

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Putting our money where our mouths are? Donations to NGOs and support for foreign aid in Australia
12.30–1.30pm 8 August 2014
Terence Wood, Research Fellow, Centre for Democratic Institutions, ANU; Alex Cifuentes, Intern, Development Policy Centre, ANU.

When they are surveyed, Australians appear to be supportive of aid work. Yet beyond the presence of nominal, high-level support, little is known about the nature of their support for aid, or the type of Australian most favourable to aid giving. Are aid supporters predominantly wealthy? Or religious? Or educated? Or young? And is support coupled with particular political or ideological beliefs? Even less is known about the depth of the Australian public’s commitments to aid giving — the extent to which people are actually willing to support aid work when it comes at a cost.

In this public seminar, the authors of a Development Policy Centre Discussion Paper presented findings from analysis of two new datasets – one based on surveyed support for government aid, and one based on actual private donations to aid non-governmental organisations (NGOs). They discussed the socioeconomic and political traits most strongly associated with support for government aid, traits most strongly associated with NGO donations, and the relationship between the two.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» view publication
» view presentation
» listen to podcast
» read blog, by Terence Wood, Alex Cifuentes and Jonathan Pryke on September 2, 2014.

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Private sector partnerships in development: US approaches
12.30–1.30pm 30 July 2014
Daniel F Runde, Director, Project on US Leadership in Development, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS); Anna Saito Carson, Deputy Director for Outreach, Project on US Leadership in Development, CSIS.

In 2012, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) convened the Executive Council on Development—a bipartisan group of leaders from government, business, nongovernmental organisations, and philanthropy—to explore how the US government and private sector can work together to support the economic success of developing countries.

In this public lecture, Daniel F Runde and Anna Saito Carson of the Project on US Leadership in Development at CSIS discussed the Council’s findings and the recommendations of their final report, Our shared opportunity: a vision for global prosperity. The report provides a targeted set of recommendations for the US government and private sector, calling for a greater reliance on business, trade, and investment tools to achieve better development outcomes. It also outlines specific recommendations to elevate broad-based growth to the centre of US development policy; align federal agencies with the private sector for better development outcomes; and better leverage business, trade, and investment tools. The speakers also discussed these principles in the Australian context.

Daniel F Runde is Director of the Project on US Leadership in Development at CSIS.

Anna Saito Carson is Deputy Director for Outreach of the Project on US Leadership in Development at CSIS.

This public lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Challenges and opportunities for women in Papua New Guinea
12.30–1.30pm 18 July 2014
Avia Koisen, Principal, Koisen Lawyers; Emma Wurr, Principal Legal Officer for Human Rights, PNG Office of the Public Solicitor.

Women in Papua New Guinea are chronically under-represented in all levels of government and business and face barriers to achieving a tertiary education. Those who do succeed must navigate a male dominated workforce, while a small formal sector and rising unemployment limit opportunities.

This event brought two prominent female professionals from Papua New Guinea to ANU to speak about their own experiences in this challenging environment and to share ideas on what can be done to increase women’s participation in the workforce, tertiary education and more widely.

The speakers discussed challenges they have faced working in the public and private sectors and provided insights into the opportunities available to the new generation of Papua New Guinean women.

Avia Koisen is a civil lawyer with more than 18 years’ of experience and is Principal of Koisen Lawyers, her own civil law firm in Port Moresby. Mrs Koisen is also one of the founding members and currently the Interim President of the Papua New Guinea Women’s Chamber of Commerce, established in 2013.

Emma Wurr is Principal Legal Officer for Human Rights at the PNG Office of the Public Solicitor. Ms Wurr graduated with Honours from the University of Papua New Guinea in 2007 and has since held various positions in the Public Solicitor’s Office.

This public lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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2014 Pacific Update
8.30am 16 June – 5am 17 June 2014
Various speakers.

The 2014 Pacific Update provided a forum for discussion of the latest economic and policy developments in the region.

The 2014 Pacific Update consisted of two days of panel discussions, including country updates from around the Pacific and panel sessions on: aid to the Pacific; regionalism and the Pacific Plan Review; fisheries management; and skills and labour mobility.

The 2014 Pacific Update was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University, and it was supported by the Asian Development Bank’s Pacific Economic Management Technical Assistance and the Asia Pacific Policy Studies Society.

It formed part of the 2014 Pacific Perspectives week at ANU, and was be followed by a two-day conference organised by the State Society and Governance in Melanesia program.

» view program
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The age of choice: how are developing countries managing the new aid landscape?
12.30–1.30pm 22 May 2014
Dr Annalisa Prizzon, Research Fellow, Centre for Aid and Public Expenditure, Overseas Development Institute (ODI).

In recent years the aid landscape has changed dramatically with new actors as well as new motives and instruments. The growth of other forms of development assistance has greatly outpaced that of traditional aid, this includes funding from non-OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) members (such as China and India), climate finance funds, social impact investors (e.g. Acumen Fund), philanthropists (e.g. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) and global vertical funds (such as the Global Fund to fight AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis). A new ‘age of choice’ of external financing options for developing countries is dawning, and is set to challenge the primacy of traditional donors as well as the capacity of partner countries to manage the complexity of this new aid landscape.

This seminar presented findings from Overseas Development Institute (ODI) case studies in the Asia-Pacific region (Cambodia, Papua New Guinea and Timor Leste as well as on-going analysis in Fiji), and illustrated the effects of changes in the development cooperation landscape on recipient countries.

Dr Annalisa Prizzon is a Research Fellow within the Centre for Aid and Public Expenditure at ODI. ODI is the UK’s leading independent think tank on international development and humanitarian issues. At ODI, Annalisa is currently leading the portfolio analysing the implications of the new development landscape at country level. She is also advising on a major ODI study into development progress funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. She has been an economist at the OECD Development Centre, working on the Perspectives on Global Development reports and at the World Bank. She holds a PhD in Economics and Public Finance with a focus on external debt sustainability in low-income countries.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University.

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2014 Aid budget breakfast
9–10.30am 14 May 2014
Mel Dunn, URS and IDC Australia; Professor Stephen Howes, Development Policy Centre; Joanna Lindner, Australian Council For International Development; Dr Anthony Swan, Development Policy Centre

The Australian aid budget has doubled in the past decade, but with the change of government in September, this unprecedented growth has now been brought to a grinding halt. While the Coalition has committed to keep aid around the $5 billion mark in real terms, it remains to be seen whether this commitment will survive the budget process. There are also still many unanswered questions on which sectors may be affected and which countries will be the winners and losers in any reprioritisation. What new programs will emerge to fit the government’s focus on aid for trade and economic diplomacy? How will the aid budget look now that AusAID has been deeply integrated into the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade? What will happen to climate change programs? How will multilaterals and NGOs fare?

From the macro context to sectoral allocations, the second annual aid budget breakfast was the place to be to get up to speed on what the 2014 budget means for Australian aid.

Speakers:

Stephen Howes and colleagues from the Development Policy Centre discused aid volumes, allocations and policies.

Anthony Swan, Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre analysed the macro and fiscal context.

Joanna Lindner, ACFID’s head of Policy, Aid & Development Efectiveness and Mel Dunn, Vice President, International Development, URS, and Chair, IDC Australia, provided their perspectives.

This forum was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University.

» view presentations
» listen to podcast

Blogs
» Beyond the numbers: three reflections on the aid budget, by Joanna Linder Pradela.
» An expected aid budget, we expect… we just need some more detail, By Mel Dunn.
» Winners and losers in the 2014-15 aid budget, by Matthew Dornan.
» Less aid, less transparency: the 2014-15 aid budget and the 10% aid cut, by Stephen Howes.

Media
» Scrapping the Australia Network affects more than the ABC, The Conversation, May 16 2014.
» Balanced books leave Australia, region poorer, The Sydney Morning Herald, May 15 2014.
» Development groups criticise foreign aid cut backs, RN Breakfast, May 15 2014.
» NGOs dismayed over ‘broken promises’ on Australian aid, Devex, May 14 2014.
» Foreign affairs jobs cut, aid stripped, The Sydney Morning Herald, May 14 2014.
» ANU say Pacific sheltered from aid cut, Radio New Zealand International. 14 May 2014.
» 500 DFAT public service jobs to go after 2014 federal budget, The Sydney Morning Herald, 14 May 2014.
» Budget 2014: The end of an aid era?, Lowy Interpreter, 14 May 2014.
» Budget 2014: Aid groups vent anger over cuts to foreign aid spending, ABC News, 14 May 2014.
» In depth look at the Australian budget - Australia’s overseas aid budget is facing a 10 percent cut, Pacific Beat, Radio Australia, 14 May 2014.
» Foreign aid hit hard in Australia’s budget, ABC News, 13 May 2014.

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Growth prospects in the Pacific: Four challenges driving longer-term prospects
2.30–3.30pm 4 April 2014
Emma Veve, Principal Economist, Pacific Department, Asian Development Bank (ADB); Christopher Edmonds, Senior Economist, Pacific Department, Asian Development Bank.

The latest issue of the Asian Development Outlook, the Asian Development Bank’s flagship publication on economic developments in the Asia and Pacific region, predicts modestly stronger performance in Pacific island economies in 2014 and 2015.

Factors behind this growth will be briefly discussed before highlighting four trends seen as shaping growth across the diverse economies in the region: (i) trends in resource exports and resource depletion, (ii) efforts in public financial management, public service reform, and state owned enterprise reform, (iii) tourism and service sector growth, and (iv) evolving aid relationships. The seminar concluded with a discussion of results and future plans for ongoing research on the external economic links of Pacific island economies.

The presenters were also be available afterwards to answer questions about ADB operations in the Pacific region and to outline internship and research/consulting opportunities with ADB.

Speakers included:

Emma Veve is the Principal Economist, Pacific Department, Asian Development Bank.
Christopher Edmonds is the Senior Economist, Pacific Department, Asian Development Bank.

This public seminar was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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ODE aid evaluations: volunteers and aid quality
9.30am–1.30pm 21 March 2014
Various speakers.

In recent months, the Office of Development Effectiveness, the unit within DFAT that’s responsible for the evaluation of Australia’s aid program, has released three important reports. One is its evaluation of the Australian aid volunteer program. The other are two reports on aid program quality: its review of aid program performance reports, and its Lessons from Australian Aid report.

As in past years, the Development Policy Centre hostrf a forum to discuss and debate these reports. Presenters included the main authors of the reports and external discussants. Jim Adams, Chair of the Independent Evaluation Committee, was invited to close the forum.

Speakers:

Jim Adams retired a year ago after 37 years at the World Bank. His last assignment was as the Vice President for East Asia and the Pacific from 2007 – 2012. Among his current duties, Jim Adams serves as Chair of Independent Evaluation Committee, DFAT

Andrew Collins Assistant Secretary, Aid Management and Performance Branch, DFAT.

Robin Davies is the Associate Director of the Development Policy Centre. He was previously a member of AusAID’s senior executive service for a decade, both in Australia and overseas.

Andrew Hawkins Associate Principal Consultant, ARTD Consultants.

Jo Hall Director, Office of Development Effectiveness, DFAT.

Professor Stephen Howes is the Director of the Development Policy Centre and a Professor of Economics at Crawford School.

Gary Powell Assistant Secretary, NGOs & Volunteers Branch, DFAT.

Dereck Rooken-Smith is the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Development Effectiveness at the Department of Foreign Affairs.

This forum was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

» view presentations
» listen to podcast - part 1
» listen to podcast - part 2

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Risk and hardship in the Pacific and worldwide
12–1.30pm 6 March 2014
Kyla Wethli, World Bank; Dr Truman Packard, World Bank Sydney Office; and Dr Michael Carnahan, Chief Economist, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Over 20 per cent of people in Pacific Island Countries (PICS) live in hardship, meaning they are unable to meet their basic needs. Increasing risks from natural and economic shocks also mean many traditional safety nets may not be as effective as they have been in the past.

Two new reports shed light on these issues both in the Pacific and worldwide, the World Development Report for 2014, Risk and Opportunity: Managing Risk for Development and a new World Bank report, sponsored by the Australian aid program, Hardship and Vulnerability in the Pacific.

At the Australian launch of both reports we found out the latest thinking on risk and risk management both worldwide and in our region.

Kyla Wethli is a World Bank economist and a lead author of the World Bank flagship World Development Report 2014, Risk and Opportunity: Managing Risk for Development. Kyla has a BSc in Government and Economics and an MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dr Truman Packard holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. He was a lead author of the new Hardship and Vulnerability in the Pacific report, and will present the key findings from that report.

Dr Michael Carnahan holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Michael will introduce the session.

This lecture was presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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Making their mark: the BRICS and aid
1.45–3.30pm 14 February 2014
Dr Rani Mullen, Director, Indian Development Cooperation Research; Dr Tongquan Sun, Rural Development Institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences; Dr Sean Burges, School of Politics & International Relations, ANU.

The BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – are increasingly important and influential providers of international development assistance. This plenary session provided updates and new analysis of aid from the emerging superpowers of China, India and Brazil by three leading experts.

Dr Rani Mullen is Director of Indian Development Cooperation Research and Senior Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Policy Research in New Delhi. Her presentation focused on the extent of policy alignment between India’s geo-political interests and foreign aid, and whether this is likely to rise or fall over time.

Dr Tongquan Sun is an Associate Professor in the Rural Development Institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) where he researches Chinese international development assistance. His paper, co-authored with the Asia Foundation’s Taidong Zhou, examined what China can learn from international experience in terms of laws, regulations and organisational structure to guide the delivery of its growing aid volumes.

Dr Sean Burges is a Lecturer in International Relations at the School of Politics and International Relations at ANU. He is an authority on non-traditional aid, with a particular focus on Brazil. His presentation gave an overview of aid from Brazil, focussing on the mix of old and new motivations at work.

This lecture was part of the 2014 Australasian Aid and International Development Workshop, February 13-14, 2014.

To access presentations and podcasts please click here.

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Forests for climate and development: what can rich countries do?
9–10am 14 February 2014
Frances Seymour, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development.

Climate change is a primary threat to the development prospects of poor countries and households, and maintaining tropical forests is an essential component of any global emissions mitigation strategy. Forests also provide goods and services that contribute directly to rural livelihoods, food security, and climate resilience. Yet despite decades of international cooperation to control deforestation, forest loss continues at a rapid rate, driven in large part by consumption patterns and policies in rich countries.

In this public lecture, Ms Seymour argued that success in reversing business-as-usual trends will depend on domestic political will and profound institutional and governance changes in forest countries. She discussed options that are available to rich country governments, corporations, and citizens to accelerate progressive reform.

Options include providing significant financial rewards to national governments and sub-national jurisdictions in the form of performance-based payments for reductions in deforestation, and market-based incentives for removing deforestation (and other adverse impacts) from commodity supply chains. These actions are urgent, affordable, and politically feasible, and constitute a bridge to a future global climate agreement that includes forests.

Frances Seymour is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development (CGD) and a Senior Advisor to the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. She has also served as as Director General of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), an international organisation headquartered in Indonesia, where she led strategy development and contributed to publications on forests and climate change.

This lecture was part of the 2014 Australasian Aid and International Development Workshop, February 13-14, 2014.

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Does foreign aid really work? What the evidence tells us, what impacts we should expect and how aid can be improved
10–11am 13 February 2014
Roger Riddell, Oxford Policy Management and The Policy Practice, UK.

Roger Riddell’s 2008 book Does Foreign Aid Really Work? was the first attempt in more than 20 years to survey the evidence around whether aid actually works. It was also the first to examine the role and impact of development and emergency aid provided by both official aid agencies and by NGOs.

His keynote address to the 2014 Australasian Aid and International Development Policy Workshop will summarise his findings, and provide an update on aid debates and thinking since the publication of his 2008 book. Roger will discuss what impact we ought to expect aid to have and outline ways in which its impact could be improved.

Roger Riddell is a development and aid specialist with some 40 years’ experience including senior consulting, government, non-government and think-tank positions. He is currently an Associate of Oxford Policy Management (OPM) and a Principal of The Policy Practice, in the UK. From 2008 to the end of 2010, he was a member of the Independent Advisory Committee on Development Impact (IACDI) of the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), and he led the committee’s work on the quality of evaluation. He has published widely on international aid and development issues. He holds a Masters in Development Studies from the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, UK and an Honours degree in Economics from the University of Zimbabwe.

This lecture was part of the 2014 Australasian Aid and International Development Workshop, February 13-14, 2014.

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2014 Australasian aid and international development policy workshop
9am 13 February – 5pm 14 February 2014
Various speakers.

Research into aid in Australia and Asia is growing. Aid is only one of a number of policy instruments by which countries can promote development. Labour mobility policies show enormous variation around the region. Policies on trade and in relation to international standards are also important. So too are the policies of international, multilateral and regional bodies, such as the G20, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. International climate change negotiations and related architectural and funding questions will have an enormous impact on our future. All of these subjects are under active research by various academics across Asia and the Pacific.

The aim of the 2014 Australasian Aid and International Development Policy Workshop was to bring together researchers from across Australia, the Pacific and Asia who are working on aid and international development policy to share insights, promote collaboration, and help develop the research community.

The Workshop was held at the Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU, Canberra, Australia on February 13 and 14, 2014. It was co-convened by Professor Stephen Howes, Director of the Development Policy Centre at ANU and Dr Joel Negin, Senior Lecturer in International Public Health at the University of Sydney.

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